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Atom Egoyan

Film Roundup

True Grit A young girl’s father dies, and she heads to the town to finalize his affairs, and hire a US Marshall to track down the murderer. While it seems that Jeff Bridges and Matt Damon are the stars of the film, within a few minutes of watching, you see that their only purpose is to support the real star Elizabeth Marvel who plays Mattie Ross, the young girl. Her performance is brilliant, and it’s quite the gripping film. While the Coen brothers can be hit or miss, this might be their best yet. In my mind their only competition is O Brother, Where Art Thou? See this as soon… Read More »Film Roundup

Chloe

Chloe, the latest film by one of Canada’s greatest film makers, Atom Egoyan, is much like many of his other films, spectacular. Julianne Moore plays Catherine Stewart, who’s suspects her husband David (Liam Neeson) of cheating. Catherine hires an escort to seduce her husband, and report on his behaviour. The plot summary of this film doesn’t need any more than that. Egoyan’s tale is a thriller about desire and human nature. Julianne Moore’s and Amanda Seyfried’s performances are spectacular. The two actors are able to create an emotional connection for the audience to understand before the characters themselves understand it. Neeson, however seems more of a supporting character, but that’s… Read More »Chloe

The Sweet Hereafter

The Sweet Hereafter is a classic Atom Egoyan film from 1997. Egoyan’s narrative is emotional and strong. He deftly parallels the grief of Ian Holm’s character over his destroyed family with the grief of the the small community who’s children are lost or injured in a school bus crash. Non-linear narrative is something which has come to be more and more common-place. Television has succeeded at this structure with┬áLost but more often than not, it fails when countless TV writers don’t know how to make a good teaser and instead jump to the climax of the show. Egoyan is able to successfully navigate the story in a non-linear manner, which… Read More »The Sweet Hereafter